Sunday, 4 May 2014

Bank Holiday Sunshine

We went to Mums for lunch today, she only lives down the road so the children decided to ride down, even Eden.
I asked them if I could take a picture of them all as it's ages since I took one of them altogether and although Eden takes loads of "selfies" for Snapchat she wasn't keen!
I managed to persuade her and although both these pictures are very similar I'm going to put them both up so I can look back at this post and see them.




 We had a lovely lunch of jacket potatoes, cold meats and coleslaw, followed by Vienetta and/or trifle that Clark and I made last night.
When we got home Callum, Clark and I mowed the front lawn.


One of my neighbours (not a particularly nice one) hads spoken to me before about the boys mowing the lawn, I think her point is their age. I have looked this up and on various sites on the net it says that twelve is an acceptable age to mow, although there's no law on age. Clark is eleven and Callum is thirteen and a half.


Whenever the boys mow or strim Malc or myself are always behind them holding onto the leads so they don't go over them, I'm actually doing it in this picture whilst taking a photo, I'm clever like that!
They are always in sturdy shoes, Callum are actually steel toecaps.


Sometimes I think it's not all about a number, it's about teaching dangers, responsibility and trust.
I have one friend in particular who has a son Callums age and she frequently tells me she would not let her son mow their lawn but I think as long as the dangers are explained and they are supervised it's a life skill to be learnt.
The boys do lots of things that most people wouldn't say was educational but I think skills like this are just as important.
The boys are put now playing with their friends and although we had quite a filling dinner I'm sure it won't be long before they come in asking what they are having for tea so I'd better go and find something!

15 comments:

  1. How lovely to get a couple of photos of them all together, definitely one for the album. It looks like you've had lots of sunshine today, the sun never really got out here, and we had a drop of rain this morning, but it's been quite warm. I'd be very grateful of some help in the garden, my grass mower has moved to university.

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    1. We've had quite a bit of sunshine Jo, a great day for gardening x

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  2. Out here in the wilds of the country our lot would drive an old car round the field - aged about 13 and our son was on the ride on mower when he was 10!
    Lovely photo of the children all together, I wonder if they'll let you do it again in a few years time.

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    1. A ride on mower, that would make Callums life complete I think!
      The last picture I took of them altogether was at Edens confirmation 16 months ago. I hope I don't have to wait that long again!

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  3. I'm the same - DD14 has been mowing the lawn for a couple of summers now, and I don't help her any more, since she knows what she is doing and is very careful. Some people want children to act in a mature way, and others want them to stay children too long - I think we know our children and their level of maturity and responsibility better than anyone, and I am all for encouraging them to help out and do things! DD14 has been clambering all over the kitchen on a stepladder today with an emulsion brush, happy as larry. She's done a very good job, too!

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    1. Thanks Morgan, you have put into words exactly how I feel x

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  4. I was at my Grannies elbow cooking as soon as I was able to, preschool for sure. My Granddad let me help in the garden and I could use a reap hook safely by the time I was 10. I think, like you, that numbers are irrelevant, I would not trust my 50 year old brother with a lawn mower, Every parent knows what their children are capable of and as long as they are monitored no task that they are physically able to do should be taboo.

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    1. Totally agree with you Pam, I'm glad it's not just me. I was beginning to think that maybe I was wrong to let them do these things!

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  5. You have to let children experience life and learn how to act responsibly and risk taking is all part of that learning curve.My friend has a just turned three year old grandaughter who since she was a toddler has been allowed to take risks, with supervision of course. She can now crack eggs into a bowl unsupervised, use sharp scissors, and sew on a machine with guidance. She was allowed to play with pins and a pin cushion and a button box as a toddler and soon learned manual dexterity and that pins can prick you! She has done hand sewing with real needles, threaded small beads on threads, been allowed to stir hot pans on the stove, used garden tools and now has a tree house to play in. If you teach children dangers and allow them to experience small risks they learn to cope well with them and gain confidence.
    We forget that it isn't that long ago that small children were out earning a living down mines or in mills doing all sorts of dangerous stuff, and although it's good that these things are no longer the norm now I think we have gone too much the opposite way and don't give children credit for what they are capable of.

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    1. I Hadn't thought of that dreamer!

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  6. My parents left school at 14 (in the 1930's) and started work, Mum as a mother's help in a large family with children aged up to about 8 or 10,and Dad started his carpentry apprenticeship within a year or two. When you think of that, your children are well able to work under supervision. In fact, I think you are doing them a huge favour; they will look back with gratitude that they had such capable, caring and sensible parents. I have observed that those who are brought up to sit idly while the parents work are usually selfish, spoilt and grow into thoroughly lazy adults.

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    1. I'm amazed at some of my friends who have children who do absolutely nothing around the house or garden. One of the rules of me educating them at home was that they helped me with housework as I wouldn't have six hours a day to do it whilst they were at school.

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  7. OB started mowing when he was five! Hasn't done it much since funnily enough.....x

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    1. Haha. Mine couldn't wait to iron, they thought that was a really exciting thing to do, once they'd done it a few times the novelty soon wore off!

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